Teaching Through Re-Reading

main web page view of mill marginalia online

by Albert D. Pionke, Department of English Although not specifically designed with the classroom in mind, Mill Marginalia Online offers instructors in philosophy, history, law, Classics, and English and European literature and culture the opportunity to incorporate Digital Humanities research results and methods into their courses. Each of these major subject areas is amply represented […]

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Writing Across Media: A Hands-On Exploration of New Literacies

Cartoon created by a student in EN 313

by Donna Branyon, Department of English In English 313: Writing Across Media (WAM) fall 2018, we examined modes of communicating, identified the conventions of media, and created several multimedia presentations. We looked at new media theories, including topics such as process, authorship, affect, design, and multimodality. Additionally, we spent a great deal of time exploring […]

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Under Pressure: Four Ways to Enable Academic Integrity

An olympic running track

by Alexandria Gholston, Department of English Imagine you are an Olympic athlete, and you are about to compete for your country. Imagine the pressure of having your family, friends, teammates, and your country all counting on you to represent them in front of the world. How would you handle such pressure? Would you fold, or […]

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Living to See Another Day: Survival Through Academic Integrity

Happy young woman under a banner saying "Vive la vie"

by Khadeidra N. Billingsley, Department of English In Imperial China, from the 17th to the early 20th century, individuals who wanted to pursue a career in civil service were required to pass a series of rigorous exams. These tests were only offered every few years and the results could literally change people’s lives. It goes […]

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Teaching Citations as Part of the Writing Process: Student Voices

Woman relaxing in sunshine

by Lauren Fleming, undergraduate major in English Why do students violate University academic integrity policies? As an English major, I began to wonder about the root of this campus-wide issue. I am often subject to the woes of my non-English-major-but-still-have-writing-assignments peers and have noticed one common denominator: interactions with quotations and citations. Often, a conversation might go […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 3: Teaching Paraphrasing/Avoiding Patchwriting

group of people joining hands

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner Merriam-Webster.org, considering whether or not “patchwriting” should be added to the dictionary, suggests that the concept is a gray area, a sort of “less judgmental midpoint that can be seen as a ‘teachable moment’ rather than an all-or-nothing accusation of plagiarism.” This is especially the case with writing that is still […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 1: What is Patchwriting?

big pile of patches

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner In her 1992 Journal of Teaching Writing article “A Plagiarism Pentimento,” Rebecca Moore Howard coined the phrase “patchwriting” to describe the student practice of “copying from a source text and then deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one-for-one synonym substitutes” (233). An example would the student who hews […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 2: What IS the Patchwriting Problem?

Hands manipulating a magic cube

By Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner In a previous post, “What is Patchwriting?” I included an early definition by Rebecca Moore Howard, who has continued to research and write about this issue for over twenty-five years. Her interest in plagiarism and student citation practices led her to conduct the seminal 2010-2013 Citation Project, a study of the […]

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The Benefits of Co-Writing with Students

Mairin Odle figured out one way to solve one core issue of teaching excellence across the university curriculum: how do students learn to write well in their discipline? Dr. Odle’s solution is to co-write alongside her students through a series of essay-related assignments. She writes that “Major writing assignments in this course are scaffolded, meaning […]

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Marshmallow Launchers Spur Student Writing

Students firing marshmallow launchers on the Quad

by Donna Branyon, Department of English For the final project in EN 102 (freshman composition) and EN 319 (technical writing), we do versions of the marshmallow launcher project. Students are presented with an imaginary rhetorical situation: The UA Writing Center provides snacks for clients and consultants. They would like to be known as the most […]

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