Marshmallow Launchers Spur Student Writing

by Donna Branyon, Department of English For the final project in EN 102 (freshman composition) and EN 319 (technical writing), we do versions of the marshmallow launcher project. Students are presented with an imaginary rhetorical situation: The UA Writing Center provides snacks for clients and consultants. They would like to be known as the most […]

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Teaching Slavery and Its Legacy Offers Unique Possibilities

by Hilary Green, Department of Gender and Race Studies Teaching slavery and its legacy offers unique possibilities. Since initial construction to April 4, 1865, the labor of enslaved men, women, and children had an integral role in shaping the University of Alabama (UA). By embracing this history and legacy in my classroom, I engage my […]

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A&S Whiteboard Event Focuses on Contract Cheating

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initiatives What is Contract Cheating? Contract cheating is the dishonest academic practice of intentionally seeking work done by someone else and submitting it as one’s own, and according to Sarah Elaine Eaton of the University of Calgary, it is on the rise across the globe  — a “black market […]

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A Taste of the Tide: Digital Humanities + Experiential Learning

internal page on Taste of the Tide blog featuring different recipes

by Lauren Cardon, Department of English Incorporating a digital humanities (DH) assignment and emphasizing experiential learning are two of the best ways to implement active learning techniques in the classroom. Fortunately, UA provides an excellent range of pedagogical resources on campus like the Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) , Learning in Action (LIA), and the Active […]

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Serial and Student Writing

Serial podcast iTunes logo

by Sarah Pilcher, Department of English In July, I heard the news that a Baltimore judge had overturned Adnan Syed’s 1999 murder conviction. I hadn’t listened to Sarah Koenig’s wildly popular podcast Serial in 2014, but I remembered Syed’s name from discussions between friends and colleagues. Because it was a lazy-hazy-crazy day of summer, I […]

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Pecha Kucha A Perfect Complement to Writing Courses

by Jessica Fordham Kidd, Department of English My favorite presentation from The Teaching Professor Technology Conference 2016 was Dr. Gloria Niles’s presentation “Pecha Kucha: Multimedia Alternative to Term Papers for Digitial Natives.” Prior to this session, I was familiar with the term Pecha Kucha, but I had never given much thought to how it might […]

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Session Recap: “Fraught with Possibility: Can Good Pedagogy Negate Turnitin’s Problematic Image?”

By Jessica Fordham Kidd and Dr. Natalie Loper, Department of English At the Teaching Professor Technology Conference 2016, we led a session that simultaneously asked participants to critique plagiarism prevention software and consider best practices that would make it a legitimate addition to the college classroom. We discussed various criticisms of plagiarism prevention software, specifically […]

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Pecha Kucha or the Art of Live Research Narratives

20 slides, 20 seconds per slide

by Marie-Eve Monette, Department of Modern Languages and Classics It is the beginning of class, and two students are getting ready to give their presentation. I know that they will probably talk for the 12-15 minute assigned time, some referring to their notes, others more at ease with speaking spontaneously. One slide after the other […]

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How Librarians Can Help Your Students Find Better Sources

Teaching Hub

by Sara Whitver, University Libraries One of the things we all can usually agree on is that undergraduates struggle to find appropriate sources for their writing assignments. This issue perplexes us more as our students advance in their studies. As a librarian, one of the biggest challenges that I recognize our students are facing is the […]

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Writing Well: An Incomplete Set of Guidelines

Frustrated child

“If there’s anything [God] hates, it is… oozy writing.” —William James (1905) It’s that time of the semester: final essays. But before you mash the print button or send that paper to your professor, you should take a quick look at this writing advice from Prof. Matthew Bagger. Prof. Bagger gave these tips to his […]

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