Implicit Design Principles: One Does Not Merely Sit

In “Implicit Design Principles: One Does Not Merely Sit,” Dr. Jennifer Roth-Burnette, head and assistant director of the ITAS Innovation Team, considers questions from the Digital Pedagogy Lab about implicit and explicit design principles: It was easy for me to think about the explicit principles that form part of my institution’s approach to design:  clarity, […]

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Creating Personal, Interactive Online Courses

A few weeks ago, I participated in a strategy swap at the Teaching Professor Technology Conference on engaging students online. Everyone agreed that engagement is critical to online learning, yet we couldn’t decide how, exactly, to facilitate connection and interactivity beyond the usual tactics — video, quizzes, discussion boards, group projects. With this in mind, […]

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Creating a Positive “Feel” for Online Classes

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by Natalie Loper, Department of English As online coordinator for UA’s First-Year Writing Program, one issue I consistently face is how to create a positive classroom environment in online classes. Unlike face-to-face classes, where teachers can casually chat with students before and after class, get to know them during conferences and office hours, and gauge […]

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Edgy Teaching: Learning Technologies as Frames for Inquiry

Laptop Compubody Sock

“Down with bezels!” is one among the current technology fads and obsessions. Bezels are the framing edges of the screens that compose the furniture of our contemporary worlds. High praise is given to technologies whose screens have minimal edge surfaces. For example, Mac laptops are being disparaged because they have prominent bezels, and there is an […]

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Interactive Map Brings Art History to Life

ARTmap homepage showing map and modules

Hoping to make her online course match the in-class experience, Jenny Tucker teamed up the Alabama Digital Humanities Center and Katy Allen of the College of Continuing Studies to build an interactive map for her Survey of Art course. ARTmap, as it’s officially called, combines a multilayered Google map with multimedia and discussion elements to create a richer online learning experience. […]

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An Inside Look at Online Teaching at UA

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The Teaching Hub recently got the chance to interview everyone who teaches online courses for UA’s Department of Religious Studies. Thanks to help from the FRC, we gathered together across hundreds of miles with Blackboard Collaborate. In 25 minutes we discussed everything from the unique context of teaching online to what it takes to teach […]

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Is “Learning Management System” a Misnomer?

Is there a difference between “course delivery” and “teaching,” or are these equivocal terms? What does it mean to deliver versus to teach? Think about this for a moment in pedagogical terms. Do the following make pedagogical sense? Delivering a learning objective. Delivering formative assessment. Delivering the ability to compare differing perspectives. Delivering the critical thinking. I am not […]

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Investing in Your Online Courses

Chase Wrenn, a professor in the philosophy department, teaches an online Intro to Deductive Logic course centered on building skills in formal reasoning. He offers the following advice on managing self-paced, asynchronous online courses. What tips do you have for providing effective feedback online?  Be prompt and detailed. As an online instructor, there is a lot of asynchronous communication […]

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Teaching with Guided Readings

by Andrea Barton, Department of English Introduction From my perspective, a guided reading exercise is any reading assignment that is teacher-annotated. In other words, this is a reading assignment that contains either brief or developed comments, questions, brief explanations, or other such teacher-input that students should encounter while they read. This input functions much like […]

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