Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 3: Teaching Paraphrasing/Avoiding Patchwriting

group of people joining hands

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner Merriam-Webster.org, considering whether or not “patchwriting” should be added to the dictionary, suggests that the concept is a gray area, a sort of “less judgmental midpoint that can be seen as a ‘teachable moment’ rather than an all-or-nothing accusation of plagiarism.” This is especially the case with writing that is still […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 1: What is Patchwriting?

big pile of patches

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner In her 1992 Journal of Teaching Writing article “A Plagiarism Pentimento,” Rebecca Moore Howard coined the phrase “patchwriting” to describe the student practice of “copying from a source text and then deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one-for-one synonym substitutes” (233). An example would the student who hews […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 2: What IS the Patchwriting Problem?

Hands manipulating a magic cube

By Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner In a previous post, “What is Patchwriting?” I included an early definition by Rebecca Moore Howard, who has continued to research and write about this issue for over twenty-five years. Her interest in plagiarism and student citation practices led her to conduct the seminal 2010-2013 Citation Project, a study of the […]

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The Benefits of Co-Writing with Students

Mairin Odle figured out one way to solve one core issue of teaching excellence across the university curriculum: how do students learn to write well in their discipline? Dr. Odle’s solution is to co-write alongside her students through a series of essay-related assignments. She writes that “Major writing assignments in this course are scaffolded, meaning […]

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Marshmallow Launchers Spur Student Writing

Students firing marshmallow launchers on the Quad

by Donna Branyon, Department of English For the final project in EN 102 (freshman composition) and EN 319 (technical writing), we do versions of the marshmallow launcher project. Students are presented with an imaginary rhetorical situation: The UA Writing Center provides snacks for clients and consultants. They would like to be known as the most […]

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Teaching Slavery and Its Legacy Offers Unique Possibilities

by Hilary Green, Department of Gender and Race Studies Teaching slavery and its legacy offers unique possibilities. Since initial construction to April 4, 1865, the labor of enslaved men, women, and children had an integral role in shaping the University of Alabama (UA). By embracing this history and legacy in my classroom, I engage my […]

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A&S Whiteboard Event Focuses on Contract Cheating

A&S AHC Honor Council at the 2017 Whiteboard Event

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initiatives What is Contract Cheating? Contract cheating is the dishonest academic practice of intentionally seeking work done by someone else and submitting it as one’s own, and according to Sarah Elaine Eaton of the University of Calgary, it is on the rise across the globe  — a “black market […]

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A Taste of the Tide: Digital Humanities + Experiential Learning

internal page on Taste of the Tide blog featuring different recipes

by Lauren Cardon, Department of English Incorporating a digital humanities (DH) assignment and emphasizing experiential learning are two of the best ways to implement active learning techniques in the classroom. Fortunately, UA provides an excellent range of pedagogical resources on campus like the Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) , Learning in Action (LIA), and the Active […]

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Serial and Student Writing

Serial podcast iTunes logo

by Sarah Pilcher, Department of English In July, I heard the news that a Baltimore judge had overturned Adnan Syed’s 1999 murder conviction. I hadn’t listened to Sarah Koenig’s wildly popular podcast Serial in 2014, but I remembered Syed’s name from discussions between friends and colleagues. Because it was a lazy-hazy-crazy day of summer, I […]

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Pecha Kucha A Perfect Complement to Writing Courses

by Jessica Fordham Kidd, Department of English My favorite presentation from The Teaching Professor Technology Conference 2016 was Dr. Gloria Niles’s presentation “Pecha Kucha: Multimedia Alternative to Term Papers for Digitial Natives.” Prior to this session, I was familiar with the term Pecha Kucha, but I had never given much thought to how it might […]

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