Class Management

What to Do When Your Test Answers are Available Online: Create 1200-Question Test Banks!

by Deborah Keene, Associate Director, Blount Scholars Program How often do you check to see whether answers to your tests are available somewhere online? In the Department of Geological Sciences, several GEO 101 instructors decided that we needed to create our own test bank after we found several of our exams, with answers, online (e.g., Quizlet, StudyBlue, Koofers, CourseHero, StudySoup, etc.). Our goal was

The Disappearing Student: How We Can Support Students Battling Depression and Anxiety

by Lauren S. Cardon, Department of English A familiar situation? Many of us have encountered students who follow a certain pattern: they begin the semester as full participants in the class, turning in assignments on time, and then all of a sudden disappear. They may trickle off­­ — missing a class here and there first

Guide to Managing Class Discussion in a Tense Atmosphere 

by Cassander L. Smith and Lauren S. Cardon, Department of English On February 18, 2019, the Department of English hosted a one-day symposium, “Teaching with Tension,” that addressed the extent to which attitudes about race and political environments produce pedagogical challenges for professors in the humanities. The day’s discussion included the presentation of a document

Surprise! Experiential Learning Course Design Assists Academic Integrity

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences I attended my first International Center for Academic Integrity (ICAI) conference in 2016. Fellow attendees repeatedly recommended James Lang’s Cheating Lessons (Harvard U P, 2013), which I found so eye-opening that the next year I applied for and became a Learning in Action Fellow. What’s the

Visited the A&S Academic Integrity Website Lately?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts and Sciences Did you know that the College of Arts and Sciences has an Academic Integrity Initiatives website? Did you know that it is teeming with helpful information and links on a variety of Academic Integrity issues for both faculty and students? If you haven’t visited academicintegrity.as.ua.edu, then

Under Pressure: Four Ways to Enable Academic Integrity

by Alexandria Gholston, Department of English Imagine you are an Olympic athlete, and you are about to compete for your country. Imagine the pressure of having your family, friends, teammates, and your country all counting on you to represent them in front of the world. How would you handle such pressure? Would you fold, or

Living to See Another Day: Survival Through Academic Integrity

by Khadeidra N. Billingsley, Department of English In Imperial China, from the 17th to the early 20th century, individuals who wanted to pursue a career in civil service were required to pass a series of rigorous exams. These tests were only offered every few years and the results could literally change people’s lives. It goes

Teaching Citations as Part of the Writing Process: Student Voices

by Lauren Fleming, Undergraduate English Major Why do students violate University academic integrity policies? As an English major, I began to wonder about the root of this campus-wide issue. I am often subject to the woes of my non-English-major-but-still-have-writing-assignments peers and have noticed one common denominator: interactions with quotations and citations. Often, a conversation might

Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 3: Teaching Paraphrasing/Avoiding Patchwriting

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences Merriam-Webster.org, considering whether or not “patchwriting” should be added to the dictionary, suggests that the concept is a gray area, a sort of “less judgmental midpoint that can be seen as a ‘teachable moment’ rather than an all-or-nothing accusation of plagiarism.” This is especially the case

Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 1: What is Patchwriting?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences In her 1992 Journal of Teaching Writing article “A Plagiarism Pentimento,” Rebecca Moore Howard coined the phrase “patchwriting” to describe the student practice of “copying from a source text and then deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one-for-one synonym substitutes” (233). An example