Digital Pedagogy

Social Reading in Undergraduate Courses

by Matt Smith (Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies), Andrew Deaton (History), and Camille Morgan (Anthropology) How might a class read together remotely? One way is to assign a reading and then have students respond on a discussion board. Compared to Blackboard’s Discussion Board, the Hypothesis app has both drawbacks and benefits. One drawback, for

Transition Multiple-Choice Exams Online: A Large-Enrollment Solution

by Diana Leung, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry In 2020 the changes brought about by COVID-19 forced me to transition my normally face-to-face classes to an online format. This fall semester I teach two sections of a freshman Introductory Chemistry class (CH 104), each with about ~200 students, and an Organic Chemistry II (CH 232)

Zoom Roleplay Practices to Teach Theory and Case Studies

by Elif Kalaycioglu, Political Science A key goal for my hybrid, advanced seminar this semester is to get students to think about the multiple roles that expertise plays in diverse domains of global politics. This requires familiarity with a range of IR theories on expertise, as well as linking these theories to concrete case studies.

So You’re an Online Student! Tips for Success

by Dr. Jennifer Roth-Burnette, Capstone Center for Student Success 1. Treat online study like a job. Plan 1.5–3 study hours per credit hour each week. If you are taking 12 credit hours, that’s 18–36 hours per week, depending on the difficulty of the courses you are taking. It’s a lot, but you can do it!

Teaching Through Re-Reading

by Albert D. Pionke, Department of English Although not specifically designed with the classroom in mind, Mill Marginalia Online offers instructors in philosophy, history, law, Classics, and English and European literature and culture the opportunity to incorporate Digital Humanities research results and methods into their courses. Each of these major subject areas is amply represented

Digital Fluency: It’s More Than Just the Tools

by James Hardin, College of Education As someone who teaches others how to appropriately enhance instructional practices through the integration of technology, I am constantly on the lookout for tech-related experiences that will help improve my craft. When asked if I was interested in joining a group of fellow educators from UA in attending the

Reflections on Inclusion and Equity in Digitally Mediated Learning Spaces

by Heather Pleasants, Office of Institutional Effectiveness After returning from the Digital Pedagogy Lab Summer Institute (DPL)*, writing a post about “Assessing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Digital Classrooms” seemed to make sense. However, I encountered a few challenges right away: Challenge #1: Who wants to read a blog post that starts with “assessing?”  (…crickets) Challenge

Critical Digital Pedagogy in the Modern Classroom: Expectations Vs. Reality

by Cherelle Young, Tuscaloosa City Schools What is Critical Digital Pedagogy? Kate Molloy, a learning technologist with the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at NUI Galway and a peer from the Digital Pedagogy Lab, gave a good, easy-to-understand definition of Critical Digital Pedagogy: “CDP is the practice of reflective, critical teaching in a digital space. We must remain conscious

Reclaiming My Syllabus

by Angela Benson, College of Education I have lost control of my syllabus. I’ve focused so much on making it meet the standards enforced by the online syllabus management system that I’ve lost sight of its true purpose: to invite students into a safe space where they can show and develop their greatness. I have

Digital Literacy: A Critical Approach

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies On April 18, 1831, the faculty of four men at The University of Alabama opened its doors to fifty-two male students. The campus eventually looked something like this: The photo exhibits what some call the built environment of the original UA campus. Scholarly research on the built environment focuses