Working with GTAs: Advice from the Experts

"from the real experts" written on the top edge of a book

by Jolene Hubbs, Department of American Studies What can we do to support our graduate teaching assistants in carrying out their responsibilities confidently and capably and in developing their own pedagogic repertoires? To find out, I surveyed my own current and former GTAs, asking them to tell me about their varied experiences working with faculty […]

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The Disappearing Student: How We Can Support Students Battling Depression and Anxiety

person sitting alone in a long, empty hallway

by Lauren S. Cardon, Department of English A familiar situation? Many of us have encountered students who follow a certain pattern: they begin the semester as full participants in the class, turning in assignments on time, and then all of a sudden disappear. They may trickle off­­ — missing a class here and there first […]

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Teaching Graduate Students: The Public Value of Their Work

kids sitting on a ledge

by John Giggie, Department of History In this faculty blog on graduate teaching, I would like to share a few observations on possible ways to help graduate students in American history think about the public value of their work. My hope is that as students broaden their identities as public intellectuals they will deepen their […]

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Why Workshops Matter for Professionalization, for Productivity, and for Life!

table with people's hands, pens and paper

by Jenny Shaw, Department of History One of the most important skills graduate students learn is how to receive, assimilate, and act on feedback from peers and mentors. Often, as with peer review, feedback comes anonymously, and in written form, so responses can be contemplated and thought through. But at conferences, seminars, and public talks, […]

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Mentoring Graduate Students and Uncertain Job Markets

dense fog over a mountainside

Mentoring Graduate Students in an Age of Uncertainty by Holly Grout, Department of History Mentoring graduate students is one of the most rewarding, as well as one of the most challenging, things that we as faculty do. On the face of it, our role is relatively straightforward: we advise our students through coursework and research; […]

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Talking About Gender? These Filmed Experiments Can Help

woman leaning back a male sailor to give him a kiss

by Alex Ates, Department of Theatre and Dance Gender topics are not just for the humanities. Interpreting gender is pivotal to deconstructing norms and methods in the sciences too. Could a new tool from the Verbatim Performance Lab at help you crack open conversations about gender in your classrooms? For example, The Serena Williams Project […]

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12 Inclusive Syllabus Suggestions from the Critical Digital Pedagogy Workgroup, Plus…

Welcome

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies Our syllabi are among the first points of contact with our students. And if the scholarship showing that students’ first impressions of our courses typically last for the entire semester, then we should pay attention to how the syllabus is a crucial document. An ad-hoc group of 21 faculty […]

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Adjusting to the Moment: Teaching and the Affects of Gun Violence

students in a march for our lives demonstration

By Dr. Alyxandra Vesey, Journalism and Creative Media I will never forget the first time that a student came up to me after class to request content warnings for course screenings. In my nine years of teaching college, I have received negative feedback from students who objected to what I screened for class. Some have […]

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Peer Review Strategies for the Writing Classroom (and Beyond)

students taking notes

As a student, I dreaded peer review day. The process of trading feedback with a near-stranger was uncomfortable, and I rarely agreed with my reviewers. I knew what I meant, after all. But as a writer and teacher, I understand the process a bit better, and I can see the value of a good review: […]

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The Intersection of Early British Literature Surveys and Anti-Racist Pedagogy

busy intersection

by H. Austin Whitver, Department of English Recent political and cultural movements anchored in ethnocentric ideological beliefs pose a grave, if sometimes overlooked, threat to the English literature classroom. In his opening chapter of Race and Epistemologies of Ignorance, Charles W. Mills writes, “Ethnocentrism is, of course, a negative cognitive tendency common to all peoples, […]

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