Ceci n’est pas une Ban: Engaging Travel Restrictions with Students

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, a good many marginally political events have become thoroughly politicized: post-Super Bowl White House visits, the Grammys, and yes, the granting of visas to visitors or would-be immigrants to the United States. But unlike the Super Bowl or the Grammys, many Americans have only the most rudimentary […]

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“My Worst Hour Happy Hour”: The Highlight Reel

The Teaching Happy Hour is an opportunity for A&S faculty and instructors to gather in an informal setting and share their ideas and strategies for the classroom. This year, the theme was “My Worst Hour Happy Hour,” and to enter the happy hour room, faculty had to describe their worst hour teaching and what they did […]

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Diversity and Inclusion in Math Courses

by David Cruz-Uribe, Department of Mathematics Diversity and inclusion really have nothing to do with the subject of mathematics, per se. Mathematics is among the most abstract and universal of human disciplines. Pure mathematicians work hard to strip their subject of anything contingent, anything to close to the “real world.” Attempts to decolonize mathematics, or […]

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SOIs: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Thinking about SOIs inevitably brings to mind the title The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Some comments are quite constructive and useful, prompting a self-reflection on learning tasks and in some cases a complete redesign of a task. For me these comments are great, helping me grow as a teacher and making the course better. […]

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SOIs and Self-Reflective Student Evaluations

Over twenty ago, I was sweltering through another agonizing day of my “Classical Literature Through Film” course that met in a non-air conditioned, glazed brick room that vaguely smelled of old cigars. It was my first film course, yet I realized soon, and was reminded often, that this was a terrible class. The films were […]

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Student Opinions of Instruction Learning 2.0

The Teaching Hub advisory board got together this fall to discuss course evaluation strategies. Faculty may wish to better determine whether or not to make changes in their courses that would help students learn more effectively. The conversation began quite humorously when we shared our experiences of the discursive comments section in the Student Opinions of Instruction […]

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Students Create a Cathedral on the Quad

by Jennifer Feltman, Department of Art & Art History Last week, students from my Late Medieval and Gothic Cathedrals courses worked together to layout the plan of a cathedral on the Quad using only simple tools: wooden stakes, mallets, string, and a straight edge. After about 3 hours work, they had the outlines of a […]

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Apps Offer Intro to Digital Mapping

by Elliot Blair, Department of Anthropology A couple of weeks ago, I attended the annual Teaching Professor Technology Conference, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. A quick glance at the program showed that at least half of the sessions were oriented towards online classes (not something I currently teach), while the remainder were largely […]

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5 Digital Tools for Formative Assessment

Recently, as my students were writing their research papers, I asked them to paste their thesis statements into a shared Google Doc for peer review. Working in groups of 3 to 4, they then read their peers’ thesis statements and offered some constructive feedback — all in the same document, at the same time. Of […]

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Do You Kahoot?

by Michael J. Altman, Department of Religious Studies Games are fun. Quizzes are not. But games can make quizzes more fun. That’s what I have learned by experimenting with the Kahoot, an interactive learning game, in my REL 130: Religion, Politics, and Law course. I discovered Kahoot during the Teaching Professor Technology Conference a few […]

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