Five Rules to Create Engaging, Legible Presentation Slides

filler text in giant font with white background

by Xabier Granja, Department of Modern Languages and Classics Picture this: you are teaching a content class that is not based on visual material. Maybe you cover centuries-old literary works or political movements that did not spark a major artistic style, so you have to rely on text. We live in an age where 92% […]

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Confused About Accommodations? Streamline the Process in 5 Easy Steps!

by Brittany Gregg, Assistant Director, Office of Disability Services The beginning of the semester is always a busy time — we are inundated with emails, updates, meetings, and requests. This is also when students start to send their accommodation letters, adding to the communications you receive. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) offers the following […]

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Four Short Tutorial Modules for Teaching Students About Research (Thanks, UA Libraries!)

book stacks in Gorgas Library

by Sara Maurice Whitver, Assistant Professor/Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries A new semester is always around the corner. You may be requesting library instruction and thinking about how the session(s) will support your students’ research, but sometimes students need a little extra help. Have you seen the University Libraries’ Roll Tide Research learning modules? […]

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Accessibility and Library Instruction

Gorgas library

by Sara Maurice Whitver, Assistant Professor/Coordinator of Library Instruction, University Libraries Anyone who teaches knows that disability is present in our classrooms. As you get to know your students throughout the semester, you collectively work on learning strategies and develop a relationship that supports a productive classroom environment that helps your students achieve their learning […]

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Teaching Grad Students Academic Writing

Butterfly pupae at different stages of maturity

by Daniel Riches, Department of History To me, the most important role we serve as teachers of graduate students, especially early-career graduate students, is helping them along the path of transition from being students of a field to becoming (admittedly junior) professionals in that field. This process of becoming a professional is, in my opinion, […]

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Supporting Successful Graduate Thesis and Dissertation Projects

close-up of shoes walking up stairs

by Delores M. Robinson, Geological Sciences How do we best help our graduate students graduate on time? This is a question the Department of Geological Sciences asked ourselves in 2013. We had quality graduate students, but the time needed for them to reach graduation seemed excessive. The Graduate Program Committee identified the problems and began […]

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Working with GTAs: Advice from the Experts

"from the real experts" written on the top edge of a book

by Jolene Hubbs, Department of American Studies What can we do to support our graduate teaching assistants in carrying out their responsibilities confidently and capably and in developing their own pedagogic repertoires? To find out, I surveyed my own current and former GTAs, asking them to tell me about their varied experiences working with faculty […]

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The Disappearing Student: How We Can Support Students Battling Depression and Anxiety

person sitting alone in a long, empty hallway

by Lauren S. Cardon, Department of English A familiar situation? Many of us have encountered students who follow a certain pattern: they begin the semester as full participants in the class, turning in assignments on time, and then all of a sudden disappear. They may trickle off­­ — missing a class here and there first […]

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Teaching Graduate Students: The Public Value of Their Work

kids sitting on a ledge

by John Giggie, Department of History In this faculty blog on graduate teaching, I would like to share a few observations on possible ways to help graduate students in American history think about the public value of their work. My hope is that as students broaden their identities as public intellectuals they will deepen their […]

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Why Workshops Matter for Professionalization, for Productivity, and for Life!

table with people's hands, pens and paper

by Jenny Shaw, Department of History One of the most important skills graduate students learn is how to receive, assimilate, and act on feedback from peers and mentors. Often, as with peer review, feedback comes anonymously, and in written form, so responses can be contemplated and thought through. But at conferences, seminars, and public talks, […]

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