Should Your Classes Be Like Fiefdoms or Fandoms?

Technically speaking, I am not a fan. Fans are found in fandoms, which are communities who generate a shared discourse on a fiction narrative. Fans make the narrative their own by inserting and adding their own narratives to the fiction. Fans avidly share their creations and enthusiastically evaluate each other’s work. Fan communities establish norms […]

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Roll Data! Teaching with Datasets

By Vincent F. Scalfani, University Libraries You may be aware of the rich information resources that UA Libraries provides to the campus community. For example, UA Libraries provides access to over 3 million print volumes, 1.5 million electronic books, and 200,000 electronic journals. These resources are easily discoverable from our Scout database and our E-Journals […]

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Strategies for Including Inclusion in Your Classroom 

There are things you expect from a working session on lessons for bringing diversity into the classroom; a photo of then-governor George C. Wallace (yes – he of the “Schoolhouse Door”) posing with a smiling journalism class is not one of them. Yet, this is — at least in part — what qualifies Journalism & Creative Media Associate Professor Chris Roberts on the subject. He’s there […]

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One Best of All Possible Teaching and Learning Conferences

The 2017 HASTAC conference was nothing short of amazing, in my humble opinion. The acronym stands for Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory, which is based on the proposal that “today’s new, global forms of communication and online learning are so complex and potentially so revolutionary that they demand a new alliance of […]

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Plagiarism-Proof Assignment?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initatives It’s a catchy “click-bait” title: “Plagiarism-proof Assignments.” Unfortunately, it’s also a myth. There’s no such thing. If students intend to plagiarize, they will typically find a way, despite our best efforts. The good news is that most students don’t intend to plagiarize, and there are things we can […]

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A&S Whiteboard Event Focuses on Contract Cheating

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initiatives What is Contract Cheating? Contract cheating is the dishonest academic practice of intentionally seeking work done by someone else and submitting it as one’s own, and according to Sarah Elaine Eaton of the University of Calgary, it is on the rise across the globe  — a “black market […]

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Class Provides Music Therapy to Local Community

by Ellary Draper, School of Music As music therapy faculty, I am fortunate to teach multiple courses that include service learning opportunities. Service learning courses provide music therapy majors with opportunities to apply information from the classroom to clinical settings. These ‘real life experiences’ help students learn if music therapy is truly their desired career path, […]

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Incivility in the Classroom

by Lisa Dorr, Associate Dean Over the past few weeks, we have witnessed concerning instances of bigotry and hate, and many may question whether it is possible to foster civil dialogue about the problems that face the nation and the world. While these events have been horrifying, as Michael Signer, the mayor of Charlottesville, wrote, […]

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Implicit Design Principles: One Does Not Merely Sit

In “Implicit Design Principles: One Does Not Merely Sit,” Dr. Jennifer Roth-Burnette, head and assistant director of the ITAS Innovation Team, considers questions from the Digital Pedagogy Lab about implicit and explicit design principles: It was easy for me to think about the explicit principles that form part of my institution’s approach to design:  clarity, […]

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Service-Learning in Medical Anthropology

by Lesley Jo Weaver, Department of Anthropology In the academy, we often bemoan the fragility of millennial college students — this generation whose protective parents insulate them from the risk of failure (for instance, see this 2012 Chronicle of Higher Education article). How, such discourses often ask, do we snap students out of their protective bubbles? […]

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