Faculty Blog

Adobe Celebration Week Workshop Line-Up for 2022

During the 2022 Adobe Celebration Week (Sept. 12-16, 2022), UA’s Office of Information Technology will host several guest presentations and workshops on how to utilize Adobe tools for some of the most exciting trends in emerging technology: interactive design, on-the-go video storytelling, and more.  This event is designed to spur creativity and encourage the use

Distinguished Teaching Fellows 2022-2025

The College of Arts and Sciences recently selected the 2022-2025 cohort of Distinguished Teaching Fellows. Kaleb Heinrich Kaleb Heinrich is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. His areas of research include biology education, active learning, and outreach in STEM, biology graduate student professional development, and freshwater ecology. At UA, he teaches Principles

What Does a Syllabus Convey? Insights from the Student Experience Project

by Deborah Keene, Blount Scholars Program, and Luvada Harrison, Department of Theatre & Dance This past summer, we were able to participate in the pilot program for the Association of Public and Land Grant Institutions (APLU) Student Experience Project’s First Day Toolkit initiative. The workshop provided an opportunity for us to review our course syllabi

Teach Your Students Active Reading: Assign Texts in Blackboard with Hypothesis

by Lauren Horn Griffin, Department of Religious Studies Your Blackboard course menu includes Hypothesis on your “build content” menu. Hypothesis works with files you add to your course. It also works with any website. Hypothesis is a teaching tool that allows you to have your students “show” how they are reading your course content. With

Webcameras that Facilitate Better Conversations Virtual Guests: Perhaps “OWL” Being See You…??

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies What is this? Have you tried using a basic computer web camera to capture conversations in a classroom? Prof. Loewen has experimented with dozens of methods since 2009. With the arrival of the REL digital lab at UA’s Department of Religious Studies in 2021, things have changed. Among

Remind Students to Check Their New Email in the First Week of Class

Some students might not be seeing emails because they didn’t notice the shift from Google to Microsoft O365. To ensure that all of our students are receiving messages, please remind your students during the first week of class that they should be using Office 365 to access their email. Students can access email through any

Discussing Readings with Hypothesis: Tips to Create Small Groups

by Nathan Loewen, A&S Faculty Technology Liaison Hypothesis is a tool in Blackboard that makes students’ reading active, visible, and social. It is quite easy to add a Hypothesis-enabled reading to a Blackboard course shell. Your students can then annotate, as well as read and reply to annotations posted by all other students in the

Using Flipgrid for Class Discussions: Tips and Precautions

by Nathan Loewen, A&S Faculty Technology Liaison Melissa Green recently hosted a Blackboard RoundTable where she remarked that Flipgrid is now among the UA-licensed platforms. Anyone can use their UA email (username@ua.edu or username@crimson.ua.edu) on the Flipgrid Sign Up page to “Sign up with Microsoft.” My colleague Jennifer Roth-Burnette suggested I contact members of the

Preparing Today’s Students for Tomorrow’s Workforce: An Adobe Creative Campus Collaboration Recap

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies Meagan Bennett and Nathan Loewen presented remotely to the Adobe Creative Campus Collaboration event. They discussed some aspects of how UA approaches the extraordinary conditions of 2020-2021. If you scroll down a few paragraphs, you will see what Sebastian Distefano took away from our presentation, he wrote, “Knowing

Creating Learning Communities with WordPress, Slack, and Adobe Creative Cloud

Presented by Nathan Loewen at the 2021 Adobe for Education’s Creative Campus Collaboration on April 14, 2021. Two Perspectives I wish to talk about specific methods I and my colleagues adopted for pre-, inter and post-pandemic teaching.* I come at this with two perspectives: Teaching – As a freshly-tenured professor of religious studies at a