Students Create a Cathedral on the Quad

by Jennifer Feltman, Department of Art & Art History Last week, students from my Late Medieval and Gothic Cathedrals courses worked together to layout the plan of a cathedral on the Quad using only simple tools: wooden stakes, mallets, string, and a straight edge. After about 3 hours work, they had the outlines of a […]

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Apps Offer Intro to Digital Mapping

by Elliot Blair, Department of Anthropology A couple of weeks ago, I attended the annual Teaching Professor Technology Conference, and I wasn’t sure what to expect. A quick glance at the program showed that at least half of the sessions were oriented towards online classes (not something I currently teach), while the remainder were largely […]

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Do You Kahoot?

by Michael J. Altman, Department of Religious Studies Games are fun. Quizzes are not. But games can make quizzes more fun. That’s what I have learned by experimenting with the Kahoot, an interactive learning game, in my REL 130: Religion, Politics, and Law course. I discovered Kahoot during the Teaching Professor Technology Conference a few […]

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Pecha Kucha A Perfect Complement to Writing Courses

by Jessica Fordham Kidd, Department of English My favorite presentation from The Teaching Professor Technology Conference 2016 was Dr. Gloria Niles’s presentation “Pecha Kucha: Multimedia Alternative to Term Papers for Digitial Natives.” Prior to this session, I was familiar with the term Pecha Kucha, but I had never given much thought to how it might […]

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Pecha Kucha or the Art of Live Research Narratives

by Marie-Eve Monette, Department of Modern Languages and Classics It is the beginning of class, and two students are getting ready to give their presentation. I know that they will probably talk for the 12-15 minute assigned time, some referring to their notes, others more at ease with speaking spontaneously. One slide after the other […]

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Dance and the Camera (DNCA 420)

by Rebecca Salzer, Department of Theatre and Dance Dance has been a favorite subject of film since its invention. Thomas Edison, the Lumière Brothers, and George Méliès all used dance in their early film experiments. It was the perfect material for these early films; entertaining, beautiful, and also exemplary of the full potential of the […]

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How Padlet Can Help with Group Projects

by Lauren Cardon, Department of English During the Teaching Professor Technology Conference in Atlanta, I was a facilitator for a Strategy Swap session on group work. I met with two different groups of people for thirty minutes each, and we shared our strategies. Most of our discussion focused on group work in the classroom — […]

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Edgy Teaching: Learning Technologies as Frames for Inquiry

“Down with bezels!” is one among the current technology fads and obsessions. Bezels are the framing edges of the screens that compose the furniture of our contemporary worlds. High praise is given to technologies whose screens have minimal edge surfaces. For example, Mac laptops are being disparaged because they have prominent bezels, and there is an […]

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“Bebop to Hip Hop: Young America and Music,” Sharony Green

Instructor: Sharony Green Course: Bebop to Hip Hop: Young America and Music (HY 300) Audience: Undergraduates “Bebop to Hip Hop” is a 300-level course that explores social developments, like the beatnik, Civil Rights, and counterculture periods, through the lens of postwar music. The course includes active and collaborative components and a new creative mixtape project, […]

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Active Learning Quick Start Guide

Active learning replaces the traditional lecture with a mix of meaningful activities. Instead of sitting and listening passively, students purposefully interact with the course material, allowing you to see what they know and troubleshoot in real time. In other words, active learning promotes deeper, more engaged learning, and it establishes a much-needed feedback loop. Common […]

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