Class Management

Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 3: Teaching Paraphrasing/Avoiding Patchwriting

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences Merriam-Webster.org, considering whether or not “patchwriting” should be added to the dictionary, suggests that the concept is a gray area, a sort of “less judgmental midpoint that can be seen as a ‘teachable moment’ rather than an all-or-nothing accusation of plagiarism.” This is especially the case

Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 1: What is Patchwriting?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences In her 1992 Journal of Teaching Writing article “A Plagiarism Pentimento,” Rebecca Moore Howard coined the phrase “patchwriting” to describe the student practice of “copying from a source text and then deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one-for-one synonym substitutes” (233). An example

Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 2: What IS the Patchwriting Problem?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences In a previous post, “What is Patchwriting?” I included an early definition by Rebecca Moore Howard, who has continued to research and write about this issue for over twenty-five years. Her interest in plagiarism and student citation practices led her to conduct the seminal 2010-2013 Citation

Perpetually Silent Students (Repost)

  A recent post from Stanford’s Tomorrow’s Professor eNewsletter features some great tips for engaging students in class discussions: Crickets refers to utter silence across an entire class, but the problem we’re addressing here pertains to individual students who never talk or post. The possible reasons for silence are numerous. Students may be shy, reserved, or

Plagiarism-Proof Assignment?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initatives It’s a catchy “click-bait” title: “Plagiarism-proof Assignments.” Unfortunately, it’s also a myth. There’s no such thing. If students intend to plagiarize, they will typically find a way, despite our best efforts. The good news is that most students don’t intend to plagiarize, and there are things we can

A&S Whiteboard Event Focuses on Contract Cheating

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initiatives What is Contract Cheating? Contract cheating is the dishonest academic practice of intentionally seeking work done by someone else and submitting it as one’s own, and according to Sarah Elaine Eaton of the University of Calgary, it is on the rise across the globe  — a “black market

Incivility in the Classroom

by Lisa Dorr, Associate Dean Over the past few weeks, we have witnessed concerning instances of bigotry and hate, and many may question whether it is possible to foster civil dialogue about the problems that face the nation and the world. While these events have been horrifying, as Michael Signer, the mayor of Charlottesville, wrote,

Be the Grader that You Wish to See in the World

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies Final grades are due tomorrow! My colleague mentioned that eating cold cereal thrice daily was the norm over the weekend in order to minimize the time not spent writing comments on essays, verifying spreadsheet formulates, cross-checking assignments with rubrics, and all the other, sometimes mind-numbing tasks that arrive at the