plagiarism

Revised Academic Misconduct Policy

The University of Alabama has a revised Academic Misconduct Policy. Under section C.1.a.(2), the policy includes an important change related to self-plagiarism, prohibiting students from “resubmitting your own previously submitted work without proper citation and permission from the current instructor to whom the original work is subsequently submitted.” See the full Academic Misconduct Policy (pdf)

Teaching Citations as Part of the Writing Process: Student Voices

by Lauren Fleming, Undergraduate English Major Why do students violate University academic integrity policies? As an English major, I began to wonder about the root of this campus-wide issue. I am often subject to the woes of my non-English-major-but-still-have-writing-assignments peers and have noticed one common denominator: interactions with quotations and citations. Often, a conversation might

Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 1: What is Patchwriting?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, College of Arts & Sciences In her 1992 Journal of Teaching Writing article “A Plagiarism Pentimento,” Rebecca Moore Howard coined the phrase “patchwriting” to describe the student practice of “copying from a source text and then deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one-for-one synonym substitutes” (233). An example

Plagiarism-Proof Assignment?

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner, Academic Integrity Initatives It’s a catchy “click-bait” title: “Plagiarism-proof Assignments.” Unfortunately, it’s also a myth. There’s no such thing. If students intend to plagiarize, they will typically find a way, despite our best efforts. The good news is that most students don’t intend to plagiarize, and there are things we can