Interactive Map Brings Art History to Life

ARTmap homepage showing map and modules

Hoping to make her online course match the in-class experience, Jenny Tucker teamed up with the Alabama Digital Humanities Center and Katy Allen of the College of Continuing Studies to build an interactive map for her Survey of Art course. ARTmap, as it’s officially called, combines a multilayered Google map with multimedia and discussion elements to create a richer online learning […]

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Let’s Get Digital, Digital (Humanities)! Part One

Michelangelo's David connected to a computer

The Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) opened in 2010. At the beginning of my second year at UA, I just now discovered the ADHC and its amazing home in Gorgas Library Room 109A . I arranged for a consultation with Emma Wilson yesterday. We enjoyed a vibrant discussion about how my teaching might deploy a digital humanities project. […]

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Visual Thinking in Organic Chemistry

Dr. Bonizzoni's organic chemistry class

Instructor: Marco Bonizzoni Course: Organic Chemistry (CH 231 & 232) Audience: Undergraduates Organic chemistry is the study of the properties and behavior of chemicals containing carbon as the key element. These compounds are both the basis of all life on earth (we are all made of organic compounds) and a large focus of the chemical […]

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World Literature Class Awards Book Prize

Instructor: Emily Wittman Course: World Literature (EN 411) Audience: Undergraduates Making significant use of Web 2.0 technology, I run my English 411 course, a senior-level seminar in comparative & world literature, as a prize-granting panel, modeled loosely on the Nobel Prize committee. We read seven or eight critically acclaimed contemporary novels from across the globe, […]

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Pros and Cons of Teaching with Twitter

Twitter logo

Twitter is a good tool for promoting student participation, but like any social platform, it has its benefits and limitations. This post aims to help you decide whether Twitter is the right social technology for your course. Pros Asynchronous: Twitter allows students to interact with the learning community whenever and wherever they choose. Extends class discussion: The […]

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Something’s in the Way: Struggling Students in Large Courses

Student waiting during office hours

Since it is almost Thanksgiving, many students will be leaving UA for home, where they will inevitably be asked, “So, how are things going?” Here is a short story about a student who dropped by my office this term: Last week, a distraught student stopped by my office to ask about withdrawing from my class […]

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Teaching Grammar with Corpus Studies

Students in Dilin Liu's class

Instructor: Dilin Liu Course: Structure and Usage (EN 424/524) Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students Structure and Usage is an advanced course on English grammar and usages, mainly using contemporary linguistic approaches, such as cognitive linguistics, corpus linguistics (i.e., the study of language using large-sized computer-searchable collections of language data), functional linguistics, and the lexicogrammar approach, which treats lexis […]

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Is “Learning Management System” a Misnomer?

Is there a difference between “course delivery” and “teaching,” or are these equivocal terms? What does it mean to deliver versus to teach? Think about this for a moment in pedagogical terms. Do the following make pedagogical sense? Delivering a learning objective. Delivering formative assessment. Delivering the ability to compare differing perspectives. Delivering the critical thinking. I am not […]

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