assessment

Be the Grader that You Wish to See in the World

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies Final grades are due tomorrow! My colleague mentioned that eating cold cereal thrice daily was the norm over the weekend in order to minimize the time not spent writing comments on essays, verifying spreadsheet formulates, cross-checking assignments with rubrics, and all the other, sometimes mind-numbing tasks that arrive at the

Can Multiple Choice Tests Promote Learning?

In “Multiple Choices,” a post on the blog Practicum: Critical Theory, Religion, and Pedagogy, Russell McCutcheon ponders how multiple choice tests facilitate learning in large introductory courses: But what about the multiple choice tests? Well, like that definition assignment . . . it’s more about how they study for it and how they come to

Giving Quizzes in Blackboard Learn

by Alecia Chatham, Department of Modern Languages and Classics In my online courses, I often post short, weekly quizzes that are graded immediately by Blackboard. There are a few different quiz types that I use for certain things. Key concept quizzes sometimes take students a little more time to figure out on their own, though

A Crash Course in Assessment Vocabulary

Types of Assessment Formative assessments Formative assessments informally measure a student’s understanding of a concept or concepts and thus have very low stakes or are not graded at all. Formative assessments are used to gauge the effectiveness of teaching, “check in” with students to make sure they are learning the course material and to provide

Turnitin for Teacher Self-Assessment

by Jessica Kidd, Department of English I’ve become a big fan of grading within Turnitin, so much so that I sometimes forget its additional purpose as a plagiarism prevention tool. The grading is convenient since I don’t have to lug around piles of papers and fast because rubrics can be built into the grading tool.

Think-Pair-Share with Clickers

by Patrick Frantom, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Collaborative learning is usually interpreted as ed-speak for working in small groups outside of class to accomplish a project of some significance. These types of exercises require that instructors assign groups, determine how to grade the group if members contribute unevenly, and commit significant time to a