A New Twist on the Multiple Choice Quiz

a multiple choice test

by James Mixson, Department of History Ah, the multiple-choice quiz. An old stand-by for some instructors who love them not least because it can make grading so easy. For others, especially those in more narrative-intense disciplines like mine (history), they are problematic: names and dates and other “data” are only the beginning. What matters is […]

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Rethinking How We Teach Pathophysiology: Bringing Games and Simulations into the Classroom

by Megan Lippe, Capstone College of Nursing Which sounds like a more exciting way to learn about the functions of the immune system: listening to an instructor lecture for three hours or playing a game of Risk: The Game of Strategic Conquest? I would imagine most individuals would prefer the board game option. That is […]

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“Bebop to Hip Hop: Young America and Music,” Sharony Green

cassette tape

Instructor: Sharony Green Course: Bebop to Hip Hop: Young America and Music (HY 300) “Bebop to Hip Hop” is a 300-level course that explores social developments, like the beatnik, Civil Rights, and counterculture periods, through the lens of postwar music. The course includes active and collaborative components and a new creative mixtape project, which is sure […]

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Active Learning Quick Start Guide

finish line on a track

by Jessica Porter, Office of Educational Technology (eTech) Active learning replaces the traditional lecture with a mix of meaningful activities. Instead of sitting and listening passively, students purposefully interact with the course material, allowing you to see what they know and troubleshoot in real time. In other words, active learning promotes deeper, more engaged learning, […]

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Let’s Get Digital, Digital (Humanities)! Part One

Michelangelo's David connected to a computer

The Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) opened in 2010. At the beginning of my second year at UA, I just now discovered the ADHC and its amazing home in Gorgas Library Room 109A . I arranged for a consultation with Emma Wilson yesterday. We enjoyed a vibrant discussion about how my teaching might deploy a digital humanities project. […]

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Inclusive Classrooms, Inclusive Campus

In collaboration with Crossroads Community Center and the Inclusive Campus Faculty Focus Group, the Office of the Provost will host an interactive learning exchange with lunch provided. We will provide tools and discuss ways to promote classroom inclusivity through: Classroom preparation, including syllabus, readings, lesson and activities planning; and Classroom management, including classroom arrangement, group work, […]

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Listen: Favorite Active Learning Strategies

In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Margaret Peacock talks about her favorite active learning strategies, including a creative project and a collaborative reading exercise. A few of the questions asked: What are your favorite teaching strategies? How do you make the learning stick? About the Speaker Margaret Peacock is an associate professor of history, Leadership Board Faculty Fellow, […]

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“Anthropology of Sex” with Chris Lynn

Chris Lynn's anthropology class

Instructor: Chris Lynn Course: Anthropology of Sex (ANT 208) Audience: Undergraduates Anthropology of Sex is an introduction to anthropology via a course in human sexuality. I approach the class from a four-field anthropological perspective — which means I use sex as a means to explore archaeology, culture, biology, and linguistics — and use it as an […]

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History Students Test Their Spear-Throwing Chops

Students throwing the atlatls, a Native American spear-throwing device

by Juan Ponce-Vázquez, Department of History As someone who teaches courses on colonial Latin American history in Alabama, and previously in the rural northeast, I have not had many chances to bring history to life for my students. In the past, I have taken students to museums when a temporary exhibit came to a nearby […]

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My Students are Not Missing the (Power) Point

Dr. Loewen's religious studies class

I met Ollie Dreon at The Teaching Professor Technology Conference last week, thanks to a travel grant from CCS. His recent blog post, “Hating on PowerPoint: My Take,” confirms that I am doing the right thing this term. My 153-student REL 100 course makes no use of that now-ubiquitous program. I used to be a power-pointy power user. But in 2010 […]

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