active learning

Discussing Readings with Hypothesis: Tips to Create Small Groups

by Nathan Loewen, A&S Faculty Technology Liaison Hypothesis is a tool in Blackboard that makes students’ reading active, visible, and social. It is quite easy to add a Hypothesis-enabled reading to a Blackboard course shell. Your students can then annotate, as well as read and reply to annotations posted by all other students in the

Using Discord + GitHub to Organize Small Group Active Learning

by Nathan Loewen, Faculty Technology Liaison & Department of Religious Studies Based on an interview and materials shared by Dr. Traci M. Nathans-Kelly, College of Engineering at Cornell University I recently spoke to Dr. Traci Nathans-Kelly, who is a partner teacher for Games Design courses at Cornell University, where they have used Discord for Spring 2020

A New Twist on the Multiple Choice Quiz

by James Mixson, Department of History Ah, the multiple-choice quiz. An old stand-by for some instructors who love them not least because it can make grading so easy. For others, especially those in more narrative-intense disciplines like mine (history), they are problematic: names and dates and other “data” are only the beginning. What matters is

Rethinking How We Teach Pathophysiology: Bringing Games and Simulations into the Classroom

by Megan Lippe, Capstone College of Nursing Which sounds like a more exciting way to learn about the functions of the immune system: listening to an instructor lecture for three hours or playing a game of Risk: The Game of Strategic Conquest? I would imagine most individuals would prefer the board game option. That is

Overview of Flipped Learning

by Jessica Porter, Office of Educational Technology (eTech) Flipped learning is a blended learning model that reverses the typical order of content dispersal and acquisition. In a traditional, lecture-based class, the instructor delivers the basic material in class, and students practice new concepts on their own time. In the flipped model, students encounter new material

Overview of Active Learning

by Jessica Porter, Office of Educational Technology (eTech) Active learning requires students to participate in class rather than sitting and listening to lectures. Techniques include, but are not limited to, discussions, brief question-and-answer sessions, writing and reading assignments, hands-on activities, and peer instruction. In other words, active learning promotes a deeper, more engaging learning experience,

Class Provides Music Therapy to Local Community

by Ellary Draper, School of Music As music therapy faculty, I am fortunate to teach multiple courses that include service learning opportunities. Service learning courses provide music therapy majors with opportunities to apply information from the classroom to clinical settings. These ‘real life experiences’ help students learn if music therapy is truly their desired career

“Bebop to Hip Hop: Young America and Music,” Sharony Green

Instructor: Sharony Green Course: Bebop to Hip Hop: Young America and Music (HY 300) “Bebop to Hip Hop” is a 300-level course that explores social developments, like the beatnik, Civil Rights, and counterculture periods, through the lens of postwar music. The course includes active and collaborative components and a new creative mixtape project, which is sure

Active Learning Quick Start Guide

by Jessica Porter, Office of Educational Technology (eTech) Active learning replaces the traditional lecture with a mix of meaningful activities. Instead of sitting and listening passively, students purposefully interact with the course material, allowing you to see what they know and troubleshoot in real time. In other words, active learning promotes deeper, more engaged learning,

Let’s Get Digital, Digital (Humanities)! Part One

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies The Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) opened in 2010. At the beginning of my second year at UA, I just now discovered the ADHC and its amazing home in Gorgas Library Room 109A . I arranged for a consultation with Emma Wilson yesterday. We enjoyed a vibrant discussion about