active learning

Listen: Favorite Active Learning Strategies

In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Margaret Peacock talks about her favorite active learning strategies, including a creative project and a collaborative reading exercise. A few of the questions asked: What are your favorite teaching strategies? How do you make the learning stick? About the Speaker Margaret Peacock is an associate professor of history, Leadership Board Faculty Fellow,

“Anthropology of Sex” with Chris Lynn

Instructor: Chris Lynn Course: Anthropology of Sex (ANT 208) Audience: Undergraduates Anthropology of Sex is an introduction to anthropology via a course in human sexuality. I approach the class from a four-field anthropological perspective — which means I use sex as a means to explore archaeology, culture, biology, and linguistics — and use it as an

History Students Test Their Spear-Throwing Chops

by Juan Ponce-Vázquez, Department of History As someone who teaches courses on colonial Latin American history in Alabama, and previously in the rural northeast, I have not had many chances to bring history to life for my students. In the past, I have taken students to museums when a temporary exhibit came to a nearby

My Students are Not Missing the (Power) Point

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies I met Ollie Dreon at The Teaching Professor Technology Conference last week, thanks to a travel grant from CCS. His recent blog post, “Hating on PowerPoint: My Take,” confirms that I am doing the right thing this term. My 153-student REL 100 course makes no use of that now-ubiquitous program. I used to be

Active Learning in Large Math Courses

by Brendan Ames, Department of Mathematics I try to involve my students in my lectures as much as possible. When “discovering” a new formula or method in class, I will usually begin by leading my students in a brief brainstorming session. This is typically in the form of a very informal call and response, where I

Hands-On Learning in Large Psychology Course

Instructor: Ansley Gilpin Course: Developmental Psychology (PY 352) Audience: Undergraduates Developmental Psychology is a large, 225-student course for upperclassmen. Some of the students are psychology majors, and others are fulfilling a requirement or an elective for another major (e.g., nursing and education). The course uses active and collaborative learning to help students understand and apply the key