Online Learning

Transition Multiple-Choice Exams Online: A Large-Enrollment Solution

by Diana Leung, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry In 2020 the changes brought about by COVID-19 forced me to transition my normally face-to-face classes to an online format. This fall semester I teach two sections of a freshman Introductory Chemistry class (CH 104), each with about ~200 students, and an Organic Chemistry II (CH 232)

Zoom Roleplay Practices to Teach Theory and Case Studies

by Elif Kalaycioglu, Political Science A key goal for my hybrid, advanced seminar this semester is to get students to think about the multiple roles that expertise plays in diverse domains of global politics. This requires familiarity with a range of IR theories on expertise, as well as linking these theories to concrete case studies.

Electronic Whiteboard Options for Online Lectures: iPad & Zoom or Blackboard Collaborate Ultra

by Diana Leung, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Alabama. After the need for social distancing due to COVID-19, I had to transition my face to face classes to an online format. My teaching style relies crucially on the use

Academic Support in Our New Online Context

By Amy Dayton, Department of English Many faculty members rely on UA’s academic support programs to provide students with the individualized help they need outside of class. Despite the current crisis, the UA Libraries, Capstone Center for Student Success, and UA Writing Center continue to offer support to help students meet their academic goals and

So You’re an Online Student! Tips for Success

by Dr. Jennifer Roth-Burnette, Capstone Center for Student Success 1. Treat online study like a job. Plan 1.5–3 study hours per credit hour each week. If you are taking 12 credit hours, that’s 18–36 hours per week, depending on the difficulty of the courses you are taking. It’s a lot, but you can do it!

2019 Online Learning Innovation Summit – the Notes are in the (UA) Box!

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies I am happy to write that for a third year now OLIS brought together a cross-campus group of faculty, staff, and administrators. A record-setting 143 people attended the event supported by eight UA divisions (listed below). The objective of OLIS is to spark conversations about online teaching and learning

Blackboard Pro-Tip: Step Up Students’ Blackboard Literacy

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies “We couldn’t find it on Blackboard!” Maybe you heard this about your syllabus? I heard this from my class after I returned their assignments online. Some people could not find their grades. Others could not find the general feedback I wrote about the assignment. Others still could not

Blackboard Pro-Tip: Tweaking Your Course Shell

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies The College of Continuing Studies likely houses the most people at UA with a total mastery of Blackboard Learn. If you use Blackboard and want to quickly learn how to optimize it for your teaching, then the folks at CCS may well have the answers you are looking

Zooming Your Students to Rescheduled Classes

by Todd Hutner, Curriculum and Instruction Like many faculty members, my professional obligations sometimes take me away from campus — guest speaking invitations, data collection for research projects, professional development workshops for science teachers both in Alabama and nationally, and conferences. All of these commitments require I leave Tuscaloosa for two or more days at

Digital Fluency: It’s More Than Just the Tools

by James Hardin, College of Education As someone who teaches others how to appropriately enhance instructional practices through the integration of technology, I am constantly on the lookout for tech-related experiences that will help improve my craft. When asked if I was interested in joining a group of fellow educators from UA in attending the