Integrating Technology

Tegrity and the Muddiest Point

The “muddiest point” is an assessment technique used to gauge student understanding of material presented in class or in assigned readings. Ann Carlson of Western Washington University’s Teaching and Learning Center has a great explanation of how this technique can be used. At the end of class, ask your students to write down on a piece of paper

Turnitin for Teacher Self-Assessment

by Jessica Kidd, Department of English I’ve become a big fan of grading within Turnitin, so much so that I sometimes forget its additional purpose as a plagiarism prevention tool. The grading is convenient since I don’t have to lug around piles of papers and fast because rubrics can be built into the grading tool.

Turnitin is a Process Writing Tool, Not a Panacea

by Jessica Kidd, Department of English On September 7, The Chronicle of Higher Education published the article “Could Professors’ Dependence on Turnitin Lead to More Plagiarism?” On September 9, Inside Higher Ed published “Plagiarism Betrayal?” a more in-depth look at the same subject: Turnitin’s role in the fight against plagiarism. At first glance, these are

Think-Pair-Share with Clickers

by Patrick Frantom, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Collaborative learning is usually interpreted as ed-speak for working in small groups outside of class to accomplish a project of some significance. These types of exercises require that instructors assign groups, determine how to grade the group if members contribute unevenly, and commit significant time to a