Each year the College of Arts and Sciences will recognize two Distinguished Teaching Fellows and one Distinguished Teaching with Technology Fellow during the first A&S faculty meeting of the fall semester. As members of the Arts and Sciences Teaching Fellows Committee, the Fellows will form a teaching advisory board, serve as mentors for other faculty members, provide advice on the assessment of teaching, participate in new faculty orientation, and work with the College in other ways to improve its overall teaching mission.

Learn more about the Distinguished Teaching Fellowship and nomination process.


Current Teaching Fellows

Carol Duffy

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, 2017-2020

Carol Duffy is an associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. She is a virologist whose research focuses on elucidating the molecular biology of herpesvirus replication as well as understanding the roles herpesviruses play in chronic illnesses. Duffy teaches courses in virology and molecular biology where she shares her passion for the intricate cellular mechanisms that underlie health and disease.

Erik Peterson

Erik Peterson

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, 2017-2020

Erik Peterson is an assistant professor in the Department of History. He teaches a broad range of courses, including History of Science, Epidemics! A History of Medicine, A Global History of Gaming, and The Darwinian Revolution. His research focuses on the transatlantic history of science, eugenics and social Darwinism, the scientific concept of race, science and popular culture, and biology education.

Marco Bonizzoni

Marco Bonizzoni

Distinguished Teaching with Technology Fellow, 2017-2020

Marco Bonizzoni is an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry. His research interests straddle the classical field of organic and analytical chemistry and are focused on the study and use of non-covalent interactions, the weak forces responsible for a number of macroscopic phenomena such as protein folding and molecular recognition. At the undergraduate level, he generally teaches large-enrollment lecture and laboratory courses in organic chemistry.

Jeff Melton

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, 2016-2019

Jeff Melton is an associate professor of American studies. He teaches a range of courses related to his two broad research areas: humor and travel. He structures each segment of a course around content presentation, individual engagement, and collaborative thinking.

Ana Corbalán

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, 2016-2019

Ana Corbalán is an associate professor of Spanish. In the classroom, she conveys her passion for teaching Spanish language, literature, and culture to her students, and they, in turn, develop a greater appreciation for learning.

Lauren Cardon

Distinguished Teaching with Technology Fellow, 2016-2019

Lauren Cardon became an assistant professor (NTRC) in UA’s Department of English in 2013. Her research focuses on American literature and cultural studies, and she teaches courses in writing and American literature.

Lisa Davis

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, 2015-2018

Lisa Davis is an associate professor in the Department of Geography. Her research focuses on fluvial geomorphology, which encompasses how water creates and transforms landscapes and biophysical (cultural, socioeconomic, and ecological) interactions involving rivers. Each semester she teaches one large, 240-student introductory natural science course, Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, and one of several smaller upper division courses (e.g., Watershed Dynamics, Geomorphology, Fluvial Geomorphology, or Soil Science).

Ted Trost

Distinguished Teaching Fellow, 2015-2018

Ted Trost has been teaching at The University of Alabama since graduate school in 1998. Over the years, he has taught religious studies courses in American religious history, religion and film, apocalypse in popular culture, and biblical literature. In New College, Trost has taught introductory seminars in creativity and the humanities, as well as advanced seminars in songwriting.

Jeremy Bailin

Distinguished Teaching with Technology Fellow, 2015-2018

Jeremy Bailin is an astrophysicist studying galaxy formation — how galaxies like our own Milky Way form and evolve over the 13.8 billion-year history of the universe. He teaches large, 150-student introductory astronomy classes for non-majors, as well as graduate courses on astrophysical processes relating to galaxies and radiation.