student engagement

Overview of Active Learning

by Jessica Porter, Office of Educational Technology (eTech) Active learning requires students to participate in class rather than sitting and listening to lectures. Techniques include, but are not limited to, discussions, brief question-and-answer sessions, writing and reading assignments, hands-on activities, and peer instruction. In other words, active learning promotes a deeper, more engaging learning experience,

Active Learning Quick Start Guide

by Jessica Porter, Office of Educational Technology (eTech) Active learning replaces the traditional lecture with a mix of meaningful activities. Instead of sitting and listening passively, students purposefully interact with the course material, allowing you to see what they know and troubleshoot in real time. In other words, active learning promotes deeper, more engaged learning,

Listen: Critical Reading is a Foundational College Skill

Critical reading is a central, foundational college skill, essential to all courses. In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Catherine Roach talks about teaching critical reading and how she pushes students to “ruminate” and become better readers and thinkers. Some of the questions asked: In what classes do you emphasize this skill? How do you explain critical

Let’s Get Digital, Digital (Humanities)! Part One

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies The Alabama Digital Humanities Center (ADHC) opened in 2010. At the beginning of my second year at UA, I just now discovered the ADHC and its amazing home in Gorgas Library Room 109A . I arranged for a consultation with Emma Wilson yesterday. We enjoyed a vibrant discussion about

Listen: Favorite Active Learning Strategies

In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Margaret Peacock talks about her favorite active learning strategies, including a creative project and a collaborative reading exercise. A few of the questions asked: What are your favorite teaching strategies? How do you make the learning stick? About the Speaker Margaret Peacock is an associate professor of history, Leadership Board Faculty Fellow,

Listen: Strong Discussions Start with Strong Questions

Listen to Nathan Loewen and Margaret Peacock discuss the Socratic method and what it takes to foster productive class discussions. About the Speaker Margaret Peacock is an associate professor of history, Leadership Board Faculty Fellow, and the Tuscaloosa-area coordinator the the organization College Admissions Made Possible (CAMP). She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on the Cold War and

Students’ Opinions Instruction are In! Now What?

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies Sometimes there is a considerable difference between a professor’s evaluation of a course and those of the students. The divergence can work in either direction. Perhaps a “terrible” experience for the professor was “absolutely brilliant” for the students. Let’s be honest, however: the opposite situation is difficult news.

World Literature Class Awards Book Prize

Instructor: Emily Wittman Course: World Literature (EN 411) Audience: Undergraduates Making significant use of Web 2.0 technology, I run my English 411 course, a senior-level seminar in comparative & world literature, as a prize-granting panel, modeled loosely on the Nobel Prize committee. We read seven or eight critically acclaimed contemporary novels from across the globe,

“Anthropology of Sex” with Chris Lynn

Instructor: Chris Lynn Course: Anthropology of Sex (ANT 208) Audience: Undergraduates Anthropology of Sex is an introduction to anthropology via a course in human sexuality. I approach the class from a four-field anthropological perspective — which means I use sex as a means to explore archaeology, culture, biology, and linguistics — and use it as an