social sciences

Listen: Favorite Active Learning Strategies

In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Margaret Peacock talks about her favorite active learning strategies, including a creative project and a collaborative reading exercise. A few of the questions asked: What are your favorite teaching strategies? How do you make the learning stick? About the Speaker Margaret Peacock is an associate professor of history, Leadership Board Faculty Fellow,

“Anthropology of Sex” with Chris Lynn

Instructor: Chris Lynn Course: Anthropology of Sex (ANT 208) Audience: Undergraduates Anthropology of Sex is an introduction to anthropology via a course in human sexuality. I approach the class from a four-field anthropological perspective — which means I use sex as a means to explore archaeology, culture, biology, and linguistics — and use it as an

Diversity in Field Research

In their recent posts, Jo Weaver and Chris Lynn considers how field work effects the family and how it’s difficult to teach because it depends more on relationships than technical know-how. In “Talking about Race with ‘White Person Bias,’” Weaver notes that social tension shapes teaching and field research, and she asks researchers to re-examine their authority.

How I Guide Students to Read for My Class

by Chris Lynn, Department of Anthropology One of the downsides of being a professor is that we were all the types of people who generally liked to read and liked to learn more, which is what led us to be successful in college, go on to graduate school, and become professors. The easiest students to

Hands-On Learning in Large Psychology Course

Instructor: Ansley Gilpin Course: Developmental Psychology (PY 352) Audience: Undergraduates Developmental Psychology is a large, 225-student course for upperclassmen. Some of the students are psychology majors, and others are fulfilling a requirement or an elective for another major (e.g., nursing and education). The course uses active and collaborative learning to help students understand and apply the key