A Guide to Managing Class Discussion in a Tense Atmosphere 

Insect floating on the surface of water

by Cassander L. Smith and Lauren S. Cardon, Department of English On February 18, 2019, the Department of English hosted a one-day symposium, “Teaching with Tension,” that addressed the extent to which attitudes about race and political environments produce pedagogical challenges for professors in the humanities. The day’s discussion included the presentation of a document […]

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Piloting ePortfolios in the First-Year Writing Program

Students working on ePortfolios in Dr. Kidd's classroom.

by Jessica Fordham Kidd, Department of English On February 22, 2019, Natalie Loper, Brooke Champagne, and I participated in the FRC’s Faculty Technology Showcase with a presentation on the First-Year Writing Program’s (FWP) ePortfolio Pilot program, which is in its second semester. This ePortfolio initiative was inspired by Dr. Kathleen Blake Yancey’s visit to UA […]

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Electronic Whiteboard Alternatives in Large Lecture Halls

large enrollment classroom

by Diana Leung, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry The Large Classroom Challenge Since chemistry is a visual subject, where structures must be drawn out, problems worked through, and equations presented, the use of handwritten notes is critical. During my time at in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Alabama, I have […]

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2019 Online Learning Innovation Summit – the Notes are in the (UA) Box!

keynote speaker from Air Force University

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies I am happy to write that for a third year now OLIS brought together a cross-campus group of faculty, staff, and administrators. A record-setting 143 people attended the event supported by eight UA divisions (listed below). The objective of OLIS is to spark conversations about online teaching and learning […]

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Under Pressure: Four Ways to Enable Academic Integrity

An olympic running track

by Alexandria Gholston, Department of English Imagine you are an Olympic athlete, and you are about to compete for your country. Imagine the pressure of having your family, friends, teammates, and your country all counting on you to represent them in front of the world. How would you handle such pressure? Would you fold, or […]

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Teaching Citations as Part of the Writing Process: Student Voices

Woman relaxing in sunshine

by Lauren Fleming, undergraduate major in English Why do students violate University academic integrity policies? As an English major, I began to wonder about the root of this campus-wide issue. I am often subject to the woes of my non-English-major-but-still-have-writing-assignments peers and have noticed one common denominator: interactions with quotations and citations. Often, a conversation might go […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 3: Teaching Paraphrasing/Avoiding Patchwriting

group of people joining hands

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner Merriam-Webster.org, considering whether or not “patchwriting” should be added to the dictionary, suggests that the concept is a gray area, a sort of “less judgmental midpoint that can be seen as a ‘teachable moment’ rather than an all-or-nothing accusation of plagiarism.” This is especially the case with writing that is still […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 1: What is Patchwriting?

big pile of patches

by Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner In her 1992 Journal of Teaching Writing article “A Plagiarism Pentimento,” Rebecca Moore Howard coined the phrase “patchwriting” to describe the student practice of “copying from a source text and then deleting some words, altering grammatical structures, or plugging in one-for-one synonym substitutes” (233). An example would the student who hews […]

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Solving the Patchwriting Problem, Part 2: What IS the Patchwriting Problem?

Hands manipulating a magic cube

By Karen Hollingsworth Gardiner In a previous post, “What is Patchwriting?” I included an early definition by Rebecca Moore Howard, who has continued to research and write about this issue for over twenty-five years. Her interest in plagiarism and student citation practices led her to conduct the seminal 2010-2013 Citation Project, a study of the […]

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Use Your LMS to Reclaim Your Syllabus

neon sign saying open 24 hours

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies Cutting to the chase Here is how to make your syllabi openly accessible online. Have your syllabi do less and then use your institution’s Learning Management System (LMS) to make up the difference and then some! I previously challenged the notion of “learning management” and championed what an LMS […]

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