Edgy Teaching: Learning Technologies as Frames for Inquiry

“Down with bezels!” is one among the current technology fads and obsessions. Bezels are the framing edges of the screens that compose the furniture of our contemporary worlds. High praise is given to technologies whose screens have minimal edge surfaces. For example, Mac laptops are being disparaged because they have prominent bezels, and there is an […]

Read More

How Librarians Can Help Your Students Find Better Sources

by Sara Whitver, University Libraries One of the things we all can usually agree on is that undergraduates struggle to find appropriate sources for their writing assignments. This issue perplexes us more as our students advance in their studies. As a librarian, one of the biggest challenges that I recognize our students are facing is the […]

Read More

Want to Help Students Annotate? Here’s a Hypothes.is

How do you annotate your texts? How do you think your students annotate their texts? Among the likely answers to the former include writing marginalia and underlining with a pen or pencil. Some may answer the latter the same way. In any case, the typical method for doing close reading involves interacting with hard-copy. The situation changes […]

Read More

Voyant Tools for Basic Text Analysis

Whether you teach literature, history, or something in between, your students may benefit from the use of digital tools that enable them to dig deeper into a text and visualize its patterns and trends. Voyant Tools offers a suite of web-based tools that allow you to upload texts and perform basic text mining functions. The most popular item in the Voyant toolkit is Cirrus, a word cloud […]

Read More

Listen: Critical Reading is a Foundational College Skill

Critical reading is a central, foundational college skill, essential to all courses. In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Catherine Roach talks about teaching critical reading and how she pushes students to “ruminate” and become better readers and thinkers. Some of the questions asked: In what classes do you emphasize this skill? How do you explain critical […]

Read More

Listen: Favorite Active Learning Strategies

In this interview with Nathan Loewen, Margaret Peacock talks about her favorite active learning strategies, including a creative project and a collaborative reading exercise. A few of the questions asked: What are your favorite teaching strategies? How do you make the learning stick? About the Speaker Margaret Peacock is an associate professor of history, Leadership Board Faculty Fellow, […]

Read More

Teaching with Guided Readings

by Andrea Barton, Department of English Introduction From my perspective, a guided reading exercise is any reading assignment that is teacher-annotated. In other words, this is a reading assignment that contains either brief or developed comments, questions, brief explanations, or other such teacher-input that students should encounter while they read. This input functions much like […]

Read More

How I Guide Students to Read for My Class

by Chris Lynn, Department of Anthropology One of the downsides of being a professor is that we were all the types of people who generally liked to read and liked to learn more, which is what led us to be successful in college, go on to graduate school, and become professors. The easiest students to […]

Read More