A ‘Hipster’s’ Introduction to Religion

In “A ‘Hipster’s’ Introduction to the Study of Religion,” Nathan Loewen talks about his approach to teaching REL 100 and the academic study of religion: My class sessions are structured as active learning based critical inquiries into how public and scholarly discourses deploy grammar and terms to frame “religion,” where examples from the everyday interact with those […]

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Further Response to “Lecture Me. Really.”

Lisa Dorr, Associate Professor of History and A&S Associate Dean I too felt a little dismayed by the “Lecture Me. Really” column in The New York Times. Don’t get me wrong — I love a good lecture. I love to give what I hope is a good lecture. But what worked for me isn’t necessarily […]

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“Lecture Me.” Really?

In “Lecture Me. Really,” an opinion piece in The New York Times Sunday Review, Molly Worthen argues, “Listening continuously and taking notes for an hour is an unusual cognitive experience for most young people,” and “the vogue of learning” is pedagogically blinding to the value of ancient learning methods. She writes that lectures are not […]

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My Students are Not Missing the (Power) Point

I met Ollie Dreon at The Teaching Professor Technology Conference last week, thanks to a travel grant from CCS. His recent blog post, “Hating on PowerPoint: My Take,” confirms that I am doing the right thing this term. My 153-student REL 100 course makes no use of that now-ubiquitous program. I used to be a power-pointy power user. But in 2010 […]

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How to Get Away with Murder, or How to Kill Student Participation

There is a television show on ABC where a professor takes five students under the wing. The teacher is charismatic, unconventional and named Professor Keating. The plot quickly differs from that of the earlier Professor John Keating in Dead Poets Society, except for one thing: both of them get away with murder. Their command of the classroom kills student […]

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Favorite Strategies: A Lecture Formula

by Brendan Ames I try to help my students develop their mathematical intuition and reasoning skills rather than simply teaching them how to make calculations. My lectures tend to follow a somewhat strict formula: Introduce a problem Discuss/investigate methods of solving the problem Arrive at a method for solving the problem Apply this method to […]

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