Critical Digital Pedagogy in the Modern Classroom: Expectations Vs. Reality

people holding large puzzle pieces on a table

by Cherelle Young, Tuscaloosa City Schools What is Critical Digital Pedagogy? Kate Molloy, a learning technologist with the Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at NUI Galway and a peer from the Digital Pedagogy Lab, gave a good, easy-to-understand definition of Critical Digital Pedagogy: “CDP is the practice of reflective, critical teaching in a digital space. We must remain conscious […]

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Digital Literacy: A Critical Approach

Woods Quad at University of Alabama in 1831

by Nathan Loewen, Department of Religious Studies On April 18, 1831, the faculty of four men at The University of Alabama opened its doors to fifty-two male students. The campus eventually looked something like this: The photo exhibits what some call the built environment of the original UA campus. Scholarly research on the built environment focuses […]

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Three Kinds of Unknowns You MightShould Know… (Or, Cracking Open Some Johari Windows)

building with open windows

You mightshould.   While strolling through the Kentuck Festival in 2013, I saw these words printed on a postcard made by the Southern Letter Press. I thought the phrase was odd. I thought the phrase did not exist. I asked a friend what it meant, and she said people say it all the time. Technically speaking, the sentence above […]

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Teaching Slavery and Its Legacy Offers Unique Possibilities

by Hilary Green, Department of Gender and Race Studies Teaching slavery and its legacy offers unique possibilities. Since initial construction to April 4, 1865, the labor of enslaved men, women, and children had an integral role in shaping the University of Alabama (UA). By embracing this history and legacy in my classroom, I engage my […]

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Fostering a Safe Class Environment for LGBTQ+ Students

Setting the Tone There are steps you can take to ensure your classroom is a safe space for all students. Some of these can be taken before the start of the semester. You can include a ‘classroom environment’ policy on your syllabus to reassure LGBTQ+ students that your class is a place for open, respectful […]

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Strategies for Including Inclusion in Your Classroom

Dr. Frank Deaver's journalism class meets Gov. Wallace, 1985

by John Miller, New College There are things you expect from a working session on lessons for bringing diversity into the classroom; a photo of then-governor George C. Wallace (yes – he of the “Schoolhouse Door”) posing with a smiling journalism class is not one of them. Yet, this is — at least in part — what qualifies Journalism & Creative Media Associate Professor Chris […]

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Student Perspectives: Civility, Dialogue, and Inclusion

Lane McLelland, director of Crossroads Community Center, asked students how they wish to experience civility, inclusion, and dialogue in the classroom. Here’s what they had to say. Consider the classroom space “Simply rearranging the classroom space can astronomically enhance the civility and inclusivity of a classroom. Traditional classrooms tend to not only be intimidating but […]

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Ceci n’est pas une Ban: Engaging Travel Restrictions with Students

Big Al's student visa

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, a good many marginally political events have become thoroughly politicized: post-Super Bowl White House visits, the Grammys, and yes, the granting of visas to visitors or would-be immigrants to the United States. But unlike the Super Bowl or the Grammys, many Americans have only the most rudimentary […]

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Diversity and Inclusion in Math Courses

by David Cruz-Uribe, Department of Mathematics Diversity and inclusion really have nothing to do with the subject of mathematics, per se. Mathematics is among the most abstract and universal of human disciplines. Pure mathematicians work hard to strip their subject of anything contingent, anything to close to the “real world.” Attempts to decolonize mathematics, or […]

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